Saturday, October 23, 2010

Imputing Income for Support Purposes

If you live in Ontario and are involved in a family law matter, you may have heard about the possibility of someone (perhaps you) being imputed with income. What does this mean?

The Child Support Guidelines (both at the provincial and federal level) give the Court the power to make a finding that a payor of child support should be treated, for the purposes of a court case, as if he or she were making an income which is not actually being received by that person.

There are a number of scenarios in which this may take place. By way of one example only: a parent claims that he or she cannot pay support because they are jobless and yet, that parent cannot provide a persuasive reason for their being unemployed. Plainly put, if a parent deliberately tries to avoid their child support obligations by being without employment, that parent risks being imputed with income by the Court, usually based on their historical ability to earn a particular level of income.

Imputed income is an interesting but complex area of family law and I encourage you to speak to a lawyer about your particular scenario to see if the concept is relevant to your case.

3 comments:

  1. Wow Some great articles here on some important family law topics. When it comes to spousal support it may help to consult with a CDFA.

    What is a CDFA™ and how do they help divorcing people? The role of the CDFA™ is to assist the client and his/her lawyer to understand how the financial decisions he/she makes today will impact the client’s financial future. For a CDFA™ near you click hear

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  2. I would be pleased if all WebPages provided such articles.
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  3. A copy of this agreement will be kept on file at the office of your divorce lawyer and a copy will also be provided to you for safekeeping. The information contained in this article is designed to be used for reference purposes only. Get Child Custody Help in Reno from Qualified Divorce Lawyers Today! It should not be used as, in place of or in conjunction with professional legal advice regarding divorce.

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